FAQs

Psychoanalysis deals with the whole range of symptoms, including anxiety, depression, phobias, psychosomatic conditions, obsessive-compulsive behaviours, and symptoms associated with eating, with sex, with sexual and gender identity, among others. Psychoanalysis also produces insights into questions that arise in everyday life: difficulties with family; separation; conflict at work; coping with bullying; the effects of retirement; anxiety about first-time parenthood; the effects of traumatic events; bereavement.

What kind of psychoanalysis do I practise?

How is psychoanalysis conducted?

How often are the sessions?


What kind of psychoanalysis do I practise?

My psychoanalytic orientation is Lacanian: that is, my theoretical base and clinical practice is drawn from the work of French psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Jacques Lacan who, in his reworking of the work of Sigmund Freud, not only radically rewrote that work but in the process formulated a distinct and original way of thinking and working psychoanalytically.

I chose Lacanian psychoanalysis for several reasons:

back to top


How is psychoanalysis conducted?

There is one fundamental rule to psychoanalytic work: the analysand speaks whatever is on his or her mind. This is the rule of ‘free association’: one tries to speak as freely as one can, without censoring.

back to top


back to top


How often are the sessions?

Preliminary sessions are usually once a week. Otherwise, frequency of sessions is determined within the analysis.

back to top